Australian traveler asks why US products require taxes and tips

An Australian health coach traveling abroad in the United States has detailed her disdain for having to pay tax and a tip on top of the “regular price” for food and drink purchases.

Bec Hardgrave, who is from Brisbane, Queensland, took to TikTok on Thursday to share her experiences ordering meals in the US and how it differs from Down Under.

‘Okay, there are two things in the United States that surprise me and they are tips and taxes. I am still very confused on the subject, but I will try to explain it to you,” she said.

Bec Hardgrave, who is from Brisbane, Queensland, took to TikTok on Thursday to share her experiences ordering meals in the US and how it differs from Down Under.

'Okay, there are two things in the United States that surprise me and they are tips and taxes.  I'm still very confused on the subject, but I'll try to explain it to you,' she said.

Bec Hardgrave, who is from Brisbane, Queensland, took to TikTok on Thursday to share her experiences ordering meals in the US and how it differs from Down Under.

“So basically I’ll go to a coffee shop and order an avocado toast and it’ll be like $7, but wait, it’s not $7 because when you get to the register and pay for the avocado toast, it’s $7 plus tax.” . of that and then a minimum 18 percent tip for your waiter or waitress, even if they didn’t talk to you.

“I probably sound like a jerk, but they literally ask you for a tip everywhere you go, even if the waiter is pushing a button.” it’s mental. And the fact that tax isn’t included means it’s a complete surprise on the record.

Australians pay a Goods and Services Tax (GST) on products, but it’s added to the final price before the item hits the shelves, making it much easier to calculate.

In America, waiters rely on tips of 18 percent or more to create a living wage.

His followers were horrified at the news and said they couldn’t believe how expensive products were when the tax was added.

Feeling confused, Bec posted a TikTok video and said:

Feeling confused, Bec posted a TikTok video and said, “I was told mains are mains and mains are mains. Can someone clear that up for me?”

‘Do you really have to tip for takeout? I am haunted by the memory of trying to tip for sushi in Los Angeles and they looked at me like I was crazy,” one woman said.

“We have it better in Australia, we don’t realize until we go abroad how big a difference there is between our country and other countries,” said another.

Bec also noticed on her travels that every main course she ordered was ‘huge’ compared to the main course when she went out to dinner.

In Australia, the United Kingdom, and New Zealand, an entree is a smaller dish served before the larger main meal, but this is not the case in the United States.

Unaware of the difference in portion sizes, Bec joked that her clothes ‘don’t fit her anymore’ and that she has trouble putting her jeans on.

While traveling across the United States, Australian health and fitness coach Bec Hardgrave (pictured) noticed that every entree was

On one occasion, he ordered nachos with guacamole, sour cream, tomatoes, beans, and cheese, but the

While traveling across America, Australian health and fitness coach Bec Hardgrave (left) noticed that each main course was ‘huge’ compared to the main course when dining out. On one occasion she ordered some nachos that seemed to be shared between two (right)

“I’m an Australian traveling through America and I have a problem with you Americans so listen up,” Bec said in the video.

“Basically, every time I’ve been to a diner or restaurant, the entrees are huge!”

‘And I’ve been told that mains are mains and mains are mains. Can someone clarify that for me? Because I’m so confused and my clothes don’t fit me anymore.’

He continued with a laugh, “I can’t pull up my jeans anymore, so if someone could tell me, I’d really appreciate it.”

On one occasion he ordered nachos with guacamole, sour cream, tomatoes, beans, and cheese, but the “main course” was the size of a huge plate that looked like it could be shared by two.

In the comments, other TikTok users explained why entrees are bigger than entrees in the US. 'Appetizers are like the "snack" before the meal and then the entree is the main course!'  one person wrote

In the comments, other TikTok users explained why entrees are bigger than entrees in the US ‘Appetizers are like the ‘sandwich’ before the meal and then the entrée is the entrée! !’ one person wrote

In the comments, other TikTok users explained why entrees are bigger than entrees in the US.

‘Appetizers are like the ‘sandwich’ before the meal and then the main course is the main course!’ one person wrote.

But Bec, still confused, replied: ‘So what are the main ones?! I swear every menu has starters and mains!

Another person added: ‘Americans call ‘main course’ ‘entrée’ because of dining etiquette in the 19th century.

‘In the 19th century, they usually had up to 15 courses, with ‘starter’ defining the beginning of ‘main course’.

‘When this label later changed and ‘main courses’ only consisted of one course, instead of four or five, ‘entrée’ became the definition.’

Since then, the short video has also been viewed more than 7,000 times.

WHY AMERICANS CALL AN ENTRANCE MAIN COURSE:

The word ‘entree’ was imported from France to the United States in the late 19th century by French chefs in fancy New York restaurants.

At the time, meals often consisted of up to 15 courses, although this changed in the 20th century when meals became simpler and fewer courses were served.

Prohibition and the Great Depression changed eating habits and beauty standards.

Even though the entrée was removed from menus (along with many other cut dishes), the term ‘entrée’ remained on American menus.

So the entry lived on, but not in its original form. In the US, the appetizer became the main course and the appetizers or entrees became the first course.

In France, the main course stuck with its translation (‘start’, ‘beginning’, ‘starter’) and the position of being the dish before the roast, thus becoming the first course.

Currently, in the UK, Australia and New Zealand, the word entrée refers to a starter or starters, after the appetizers but before the main course.

Font: French

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